En Fr Nl

self-appropriation a short presentation

En

About the Self-appropriation series

The new series “Self-Appropriation” of Roger Wagner shows exactly what its title promises: a fictitious documentation of his own photographic motifs in simulated exhibition situations.

This imaginary documentation is a glorification of the inaccessible artefact per se, particularly because the actual motifs were only shot digitally, so that large-size copies of them would be nearly impossible and a retake of such a motif with an analogue camera normally fails, – because no one steps in the same river twice.

The actual presentation is therefore a consequent homage to a unique experience. Wagner’s aim is sharpness and readability of all details, which he applies to interiors (Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie /Luxembourg, Villa Vauban) as to natural surroundings (Bretagne, monastery ruin / Ardennes, concrete dam / Montblanc, autoroute des Titans / Clouds, aircraft). Besides exploring the opulent space via wide angle Wagner focuses also on single objects (mimosa, woodpecker, tiger). Sometimes he picks out details from ancient art like the exotic animals from the tapestries originally designed by Pieter Coecke van Aelst (the teacher and father-in-law of Breughel the Elder). These chimera in front of copious landscapes were called “Verdures met dieren” and were very popular with the reigning class in Europe in the 16th century.

The greatest artists of that time prepared paintings and drawings, which were then transferred into cardboards (horizontally flipped) to serve as templates for the weaver’s work. Roger Wagner appropriates these exotic motifs and transfers them into photography. Regardless their size these works represent a medium to immerse directly into a large format image with all its opulence and amenity values.


Sabine Dorscheid

Fr

About the Self-appropriation series

The new series “Self-Appropriation” of Roger Wagner shows exactly what its title promises: a fictitious documentation of his own photographic motifs in simulated exhibition situations.

This imaginary documentation is a glorification of the inaccessible artefact per se, particularly because the actual motifs were only shot digitally, so that large-size copies of them would be nearly impossible and a retake of such a motif with an analogue camera normally fails, – because no one steps in the same river twice.

The actual presentation is therefore a consequent homage to a unique experience. Wagner’s aim is sharpness and readability of all details, which he applies to interiors (Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie /Luxembourg, Villa Vauban) as to natural surroundings (Bretagne, monastery ruin / Ardennes, concrete dam / Montblanc, autoroute des Titans / Clouds, aircraft). Besides exploring the opulent space via wide angle Wagner focuses also on single objects (mimosa, woodpecker, tiger). Sometimes he picks out details from ancient art like the exotic animals from the tapestries originally designed by Pieter Coecke van Aelst (the teacher and father-in-law of Breughel the Elder). These chimera in front of copious landscapes were called “Verdures met dieren” and were very popular with the reigning class in Europe in the 16th century.

The greatest artists of that time prepared paintings and drawings, which were then transferred into cardboards (horizontally flipped) to serve as templates for the weaver’s work. Roger Wagner appropriates these exotic motifs and transfers them into photography. Regardless their size these works represent a medium to immerse directly into a large format image with all its opulence and amenity values.


Sabine Dorscheid

Nl

About the Self-appropriation series

The new series “Self-Appropriation” of Roger Wagner shows exactly what its title promises: a fictitious documentation of his own photographic motifs in simulated exhibition situations.

This imaginary documentation is a glorification of the inaccessible artefact per se, particularly because the actual motifs were only shot digitally, so that large-size copies of them would be nearly impossible and a retake of such a motif with an analogue camera normally fails, – because no one steps in the same river twice.

The actual presentation is therefore a consequent homage to a unique experience. Wagner’s aim is sharpness and readability of all details, which he applies to interiors (Berlin, Neue Nationalgalerie /Luxembourg, Villa Vauban) as to natural surroundings (Bretagne, monastery ruin / Ardennes, concrete dam / Montblanc, autoroute des Titans / Clouds, aircraft). Besides exploring the opulent space via wide angle Wagner focuses also on single objects (mimosa, woodpecker, tiger). Sometimes he picks out details from ancient art like the exotic animals from the tapestries originally designed by Pieter Coecke van Aelst (the teacher and father-in-law of Breughel the Elder). These chimera in front of copious landscapes were called “Verdures met dieren” and were very popular with the reigning class in Europe in the 16th century.

The greatest artists of that time prepared paintings and drawings, which were then transferred into cardboards (horizontally flipped) to serve as templates for the weaver’s work. Roger Wagner appropriates these exotic motifs and transfers them into photography. Regardless their size these works represent a medium to immerse directly into a large format image with all its opulence and amenity values.


Sabine Dorscheid